ALL CHILDREN'S ASSISTANCE FUND, INC.
Campaigns & Education

         


 

Education

“Ready for Reading” is a hands-on community literacy program aimed at helping children and parents as follows:

  • Parents, along with their children learn the basics and importance of reading in English. Many underprivileged families and migrant families are illiterate and/or do not possess the ability to speak, read, and/or write in English.
  • “Ready for Reading” provides a community approach to a community problem. It promotes an atmosphere of cooperation and teamwork among the parents and between children. All assignments are joint work between the children and their parents. Supplies and books are free to participant and usually donated by our partners.
  • All Children’s Assistance Fund utilizes time during this program to educate parents and children about the reality of child abuse and child neglect. Families are provided with child abuse facts, including signs of child abuse and how to report child abuse. Education helps participants learn to recognize and report suspected child abuse.
  • Participant in the “Ready for Reading” program are evaluated to help determine whether children are being provided with proper nutrition, shelter, and healthcare. Where appropriate, referrals are made to appropriate organizations, and/or temporary resources are provided until such time that permanent solutions are in place.
  • Parents are educated around necessary parenting skills, i.e. shopping, nutrition, education, discipline, etc.

Community Awareness

Community centers, schools, businesses, clubs, and other organizations are a great place to provide the following types of community education and awareness:

  • Disseminate brochures, pamphlets, workbooks, news, and/or professional journal articles pertaining to child abuse facts, identifying the signs of child abuse, and how to report child abuse.
  • Provide information about where to find necessary resources such as food, shelter, counseling, healthcare, social services, and/or law enforcement.
  • Information to help participants identify potential victims of sexual, physical, emotions, and/or other type of child abuse.
  • Instruction on how and where to report suspected child abuse.
  • Provide meals, groceries, clothing, school supplies, and other necessities.
  • Provide public speaking seminars from law enforcement, counselors, social services, teachers, adult survivors of child abuse, and others.

Campaign

Several campaigns exist throughout the year. Some past campaigns include:

  • eBay Giving Works. This program allows eBay sellers to partner with All Children’s Assistance Fund by selecting to donate a percentage of the proceeds from eBay sales to us. This program allows us also to sell items donated to our charity to raise money, i.e., Collectibles, valuables, autos, aircraft, boats, R.V., household, electronics, etc.
Click on the eBay icon to learn more

    

  • iGive.com allows online shoppers to click through their site to find companies they already do business with so that the business will make a percentage donation to your selected charity, All Children’s Assistance Fund.
  • Department store partners such as Target and Mervyn's help with Christmas and back to school campaigns by donating new items for disbursement.
  • Fast Food such as Carl’s Jr. McDonald’s, Del Taco, and local venues schedule events and give percentage donations based upon sales.
Click on the eBay icon to learn more


The following child abuse facts help you to identify the signs of child abuse to look for:


What Should You Look for If You Suspect Sexual Abuse?

Sexually abused children may exhibit behavioral changes based on their age.

Children up to age 3 may exhibit:

  • Fear or excessive crying
  • Vomiting
  • Feeding problems
  • Bowel problems
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Failure to thrive

Children ages 2 to 9 may exhibit:

  • Fear of particular people, places or activities
  • Regression to earlier behaviors such as bed wetting or stranger anxiety
  • Victimization of others
  • Excessive masturbation
  • Feelings of shame or guilt
  • Nightmares or sleep disturbances
  • Withdrawal from family or friends
  • Fear of attack recurring
  • Eating disturbances

Symptoms of sexual abuse in older children and adolescents include:

  • Depression
  • Nightmares or sleep disturbances
  • Poor school performance
  • Promiscuity
  • Substance abuse
  • Aggression
  • Running away from home
  • Fear of attack recurring
  • Eating disturbances
  • Early pregnancy or marriage
  • Suicidal gestures
  • Anger about being forced into situation beyond one’s control
  • Pseudo-mature behaviors

What Can You Do? (Report Child abuse)

Protect your children. Teach your children what appropriate sexual behavior is and when to say “no” if someone tries to touch sexual parts of their bodies or touch them in any way that makes them feel uncomfortable. Also, observe your children when they interact with others to see if they are hesitant or particularly uncomfortable around certain adults. It is critical to provide adequate supervision for your children and only leave them in the care of individuals whom you deem safe.

Support child abuse victims. Children need to know that they can speak openly to a trusted adult and that they will be believed. Children who are victims of sexual abuse should always be reassured that they are not responsible for what has happened to them. Offer encouragement for victims by supporting All Children’s Assistance Fund.

Teach others about child abuse. Help make others aware of sexual abuse by arranging for knowledgeable guest speakers to present to your organizations or groups. Encourage your local school board to establish programs to educate both teachers and students about the problem.

Report, report, report. If you suspect sexual abuse and believe a child to be in imminent danger, report it to the local child protective services agency (often called “social services” or “human services”) in your county or state. Professionals who work with children are required by law to report reasonable suspicion of abuse or neglect. Furthermore, in 20 states, citizens who suspect abuse or neglect are required to report it. “Reasonable suspicion” based on objective evidence, which could be firsthand observation or statements made by a parent or child, is all that is needed to report. Remember that you may be the only person in a position to help a child who is being sexually abused. REPORT CHILD ABUSE AND SUSPECTED ABUSE!

Child abuse facts and "signs of child abuse" information is provided by the following:

References
Besharov, D. J. (1994). Responding to child sexual abuse: The need for a balanced approach. In R.E. Behrman (Ed.), The future of children, 3 & 4, 135-155. Los Altos, CA: The Center for the Future of Children, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

Bottoms, B., & Epstein, M. (1998). Memories of childhood sexual abuse: A survey of young adults. Child Abuse & Neglect, 22(12), 1217-1238.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families. (2007). Child maltreatment 2005. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Resources

Field, T., and Winterfeld, A. (2003) Abuse - sexual abuse. In Tough problems, tough choices: Guidelines for needs-based service planning in child welfare. Englewood, CO: American Humane Association, Annie E. Casey Foundation, and Casey Family Programs.

Finkelhor, D. (1994) Answers to important questions about the scope and nature of child sexual abuse. The Future of Children, 4(2). Los Altos, CA: David and Lucie Packard Foundation.

May Quinn, K. (1991). False and unsubstantiated sexual abuse allegations: Clinical issues. Child & youth services: Assessing child maltreatment reports, 15(2), 145-157.



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